Salary Outlook for Healthy Psychologist

Health psychology is a specialized area of the field that centers on how biological, social, and psychological issues affect illness and health. Health psychologists engage in many tasks that involve health and wellness.

In clinical work, health psychologists may perform behavioral assessments, clinical interviews, and personality tests. Other tasks may include engaging in interventions with groups or individuals. In research, health psychologists may perform research on many health-related matters, such as what causes health problems or how to help people deal with pain or illness.

To become a health psychologist, you need to earn at least a master’s in psychology, and either a Ph.D. or Psy.D. to work in a private practice. State requirements also mandate between 2,000 and 4,000 hours of supervised clinical work experience after earning your health psychology degree. After completing these steps, you can sit for your psychologist licensing examination.

Before earning your master’s and doctoral degree in health psychology, learn about the type of salary you can expect as a health psychologist. Detailed salary information is below.

Health Psychologist Salary Information

Payscale.com

Payscale.com reports that clinical health psychologists earn an average salary of $79,767, with a range between $50,000 and $113,000. (Payscale.com).

That source also reports that the average clinical psychologist salary with health and wellness skills is $82,728 with a range between $57,000 and $120,000.

A clinical psychologist with health and wellness expertise will make more as her career progresses, according to Payscale.com data:

  • Less than one year of experience: $67,777
  • One to four years of experience: $75,000
  • Five to nine years of experience: $81,800
  • 10-19 years of experience: $100,600
  • More than 20 years of experience: $109,590

Pay for health psychologists also varies based in the city in which you live:

  • New York City: +20%
  • San Francisco: +9%
  • Chicago: +3%
  • San Diego: +2%
  • Washington DC: -12%
  • Los Angeles: -17%

Salary.com

Salary.com reports the average clinical health psychologist salary is $78,784 with a range between $59,227 and $98,476. The website notes that your salary can vary based on education, certifications, additional skills, years in the profession, and more. (Salary.com)

American Psychological Association

The APA reports that salaries for health psychologists depend on geographic location, work environment, educational background, and job experience. Its 2009 salary survey found that health psychologists employed in direct human services earned approximately $80,000 per year. Health psychologists who work in major universities or health systems may earn more. (APA.org)

Ziprecruiter.com

This website reports the national average salary for a health psychologist is $81,738 with a range between $21,500 and $137,000. (Ziprecruiter.com). Most health psychologists earn between $52,000 and $104,500.

Average Health Psychologist Salary by State

StateHourly WageAnnual Salary
New York$43.10$89,656
Massachusetts$42.70$88,808
Washington$42.40$88,189
New Hampshire$41.55$86,432
Hawaii$41.01$85,294
Maryland$39.57$82,304
Connecticut$39.56$82,278
North Dakota$39.30$81,738
Alaska$39.30$81,738
Wyoming$39.30$81,738
Montana$39.30$81,738
Nevada$39.30$81,738
Idaho$39.30$81,738
Rhode Island$39.24$81,609
Vermont$39.02$81,165
Nebraska$38.97$81,063
California$38.63$80,357
Virginia$38.46$80,000
Kentucky$37.69$78,390
South Dakota$37.60$78,205
New Jersey$37.52$78,036
West Virginia$37.47$77,941
Pennsylvania$37.29$77,564
South Carolina$37.10$77,163
Minnesota$37.06$77,092
Oregon$36.97$76,905
Delaware$36.97$76,895
Tennessee$36.94$76,841
Colorado$36.92$76,792
Ohio$36.68$76,287
Wisconsin$36.59$76,105
Arizona$36.51$75,946
Kansas$36.36$75,619
Utah$36.34$75,585
Indiana$36.28$75,460
Oklahoma$36.22$75,340
Maine$36.09$75,071
Louisiana$35.94$74,765
Iowa$35.57$73,995
Georgia$35.22$73,265
Texas$34.82$72,424
New Mexico$34.74$72,267
Michigan$34.66$72,084
Arkansas$34.63$72,031
Illinois$34.44$71,639
Alabama$34.40$71,551
Mississippi$34.05$70,827
Missouri$33.97$70,661
Florida$33.20$69,054
North Carolina$31.61$65,754
Ziprecruiter.com June, 2020

Job Outlook for Health Psychologists

Demand for health psychologists is expected to rise as these professionals are needed to collaborate more with social workers, doctors, and others in the healthcare field. While health psychologists usually focus on mental and behavioral health, they also work with other healthcare professionals to set up health and wellness programs. (Work.Chron.com)

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports overall jobs for psychologists will grow by 14% through 2028, which is much faster than average. Employment of health psychologists should rise similarly to clinical and counseling psychologists as there is more demand for psychological services in hospitals, mental health centers, social service agencies, and health and wellness centers.

Health psychologists also will be needed to help people with health and wellness as they age. Americans are living longer than ever and want to live healthier and more active lives, so the demand for health psychologists should definitely increase. (BLS.gov)

Another factor to consider for health psychologist employment is that some may choose to become health educators and community health workers. The skills that you learn in a health psychology program can be directly applied to health education which teaches people about behaviors that promote wellness. Community health workers work in at-need communities to enhance the health of communities and individuals.

Employment for health educators and community health workers will rise by 11% by 2028, much faster than average. Growth is being driven by efforts to improve health outcomes and to cut healthcare costs by teaching citizens about healthy behaviors and how to use healthcare services to promote health and wellness. The need for health psychologists in the health educator and community health worker professions should be strong in the coming years. (BLS.gov)

Summary

The rising need for all types of psychologists should provide plenty of jobs in health psychology in the coming years. Also, there is a better understanding of the link between mental health and health and wellness, so health psychologists should have many opportunities to practice their much-needed skills in health clinics, mental health facilities, hospitals, and more.